Tag Archives: insurance claim

Would You Hire a Billboard to Tell Burglars Your Home Is Empty?

No, of course you wouldn’t. But who needs a billboard these days, when social media does the job so much more efficiently?

If you’re going on holiday this summer, whether it’s a world cruise or a week in Bognor, it’s hard to resist telling the entire world about it by posting all over your social media. We like to chronicle our entire holiday these days, from the check-in queue at the airport to the stunning view from the hotel — and we can share the photos or videos straight away on Facebook, Instagram or other social media.

That’s all very well, if you’re only sharing them with your family and friends, but quite a high proportion of social media users have their settings on public — and an alarming number don’t even know what the settings are. This means that, among the people admiring your holiday snaps, are tech-savvy local burglars, who’ll know that you’ve gone away and left your home unoccupied, and then use their skills to find out where you live.

It would be bad enough to come home and find you’ve been burgled, but even worse if your insurance claim is then turned down. That can happen, because your policy will almost certainly have a Reasonable Care clause, which allows the loss adjuster to refuse a claim when your negligence has contributed to the situation. And that would certainly apply if you’ve announced publicly that your home’s open to burglars.

Tips for Ruining a Burglar’s Summer

If you want to ruin a burglar’s summer, not to mention giving the loss adjuster no reason to turn you down if you are burgled, there are a few simple steps you can take:

  • Make sure your social media channels are set to private, so that only your followers can see your posts.
  • Tech-savvy burglars can check Google Street View and find out if your home will be easy to break into. Do the same yourself to see if there are any obvious openings.
  • Turn off all location-sharing features, so that if you do post you won’t be automatically advertising that you’re away from home.
  • If you’re going to ask your neighbours to keep an eye on your home while you’re away, make sure you do so privately — not on social media, where the burglars can see, too.
  • If you really can’t wait till you’re home to share your holiday snaps or video clips, put them into a private, closed group that’s only visible to close friends and family — not to inquisitive burglars.

Following these tips won’t guarantee you’re not going to get burgled, but it will considerably reduce the risk. And, if you’ve taken all reasonable precautions, Allied Claims will be able to fight for every penny you’re entitled to of your insurance claim.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


Storming Your Insurer — Will You Get a Payout?

Severe weather warnings have been so common over the past few years that it’s easy to get blasé about them. However, the Met Office only issues them when there’s a “high level of certainty” that there’ll be “very dangerous” conditions — where there’s a “risk to life”.

Your immediate priority in such a case is going to be ensuring you and your family are safe, but when its over, you might find that your property’s been damaged. This could be anything from broken fences or trees blown down to damage to your roof or windows broken by falling debris.

Damage like this might be obvious, but it’s important to check carefully after a storm, in case you’ve missed something. Are your gutters leaking, for instance? Or are the tiles on your roof cracked or missing? You may not be able to see this from outside, but a good method is to go up into the roofspace in daytime, with no artificial lighting, and search for the tell-tale pinpricks of light coming through.

If the damage is serious enough, you may need to make an insurance claim. The good news is that most home insurance (as well as commercial business and comprehensive motor policies) will pay out for storm damage. The bad news is that insurers’ terms vary. If you make a claim without checking, you could find the loss adjuster turning you down.

Will Your Claim Be Successful?

Although your home building insurance policy will almost certainly include “storm damage”, that doesn’t automatically guarantee that your insurance claim will be successful. There’s still plenty that can go wrong.

This includes, quite simply, defining what is a storm and what isn’t. In practice, we know if we’ve been hit by a storm — both because of the impact it’s had and because it’ll have been given a name. However, what we call a storm and what the insurers call a storm aren’t always the same thing.

In fact, not even the various insurers can agree about this. The main defining factor is wind-speed, but for different insurers it can be anything from 35 mph to 55 mph. In the same way, the amount of rain or the depth of snow can vary, making the same event a storm or not to different companies.

There are also variations in what’s included in the storm damage they’ll cover. For instance, some insurers won’t pay out for damage to your fences, since they’re seen as high risk.

It’s vital to contact your insurer as soon as possible, if your property has suffered storm damage. The trouble is that, if you inadvertently claim for something that’s not covered, the loss adjuster may refuse payment. That’s why it’s vital to have a loss assessor like Allied Claims on your side. You won’t have to storm your insurer’s castle — we’ll do that for you.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.

Loss Assessors and Loss Adjusters — Under No Circumstances Get Them Mixed Up

As independent loss assessors, we sometimes find that people assume we’re actually loss adjusters. It may seem like a small difference — but it’s not. Imagine confusing your accountant with the taxman. Or embarking on a court case with being sure which lawyer is on which side. Not a mistake you really want to make.

A loss adjuster is employed by the insurance company, and as such their main focus is to save their employers from paying out anything the claimant doesn’t have the right to. Fair enough — except that they’re experts, and you’re not. And that means you might end up being penalised for an honest mistake.

That’s where loss assessors like Allied Claims come in. When you need to make an insurance claim, a loss assessor is an insurance expert fighting your corner. We’ll make sure you’re not being denied a pay-out you should be entitled to.

Like the taxman and the opposing lawyer, a loss adjuster isn’t doing anything wrong. They’re professionals carrying out their job — but they’re not on your side. A loss assessor is.

Why Should You Use a Loss Assessor?

So why should you use a loss assessor? What’s wrong with managing your own insurance claim? Well, you can if you choose, and if yours is one of those rare claims where everything is cut and dried, that may be good enough. For most claims, however, the help a loss assessor can offer could prove crucial.

  • An expert in your corner — The insurer will have armies of professionals, from loss adjusters to lawyers, who can pick holes in your claim. A loss assessor is at least as expert, and will know exactly what to challenge in the insurer’s arguments.
  • Getting what you’re entitled to — Insurers’ claim forms can be confusing to the lay person. It’s all too easy to make a simple error that results in getting less than you should — or even nothing. A loss assessor will guide you through the process, making sure there are no errors.
  • Speeding up the process — It’s all too common for insurance claims to drag on, while you’re coping without anything from valuable possessions to your home. A loss assessor will know exactly how the process works and can make sure your claim goes through as quickly as possible.
  • Cutting down the stress — Like any unknown territory, making an insurance claim can be both stressful and time consuming. A loss assessor will take on negotiating with the loss adjuster and the innumerable professionals you need quotes from. You’ll be kept updated, so that you know exactly where you stand at all times.

Just like a lawyer or an accountant, a loss assessor like Allied Claims is an expert professional who can take the stress, delays and pitfalls out of making an insurance claim.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


Young and Carefree? Not if You’re Under-Insured

When you’re young, you’re often confident about everything. That’s fine — but, if you haven’t made sure your possessions are correctly insured, your insurer’s loss adjuster isn’t going to be impressed by your confidence.

A recent study found that around two thirds of householders under 25 — as opposed to only 17% of over-54s — are unaware of the risks of under-insuring their possessions. And overall people renting are more likely than homeowners not to be clued in — the figure here is 47%.

If this includes you, it leaves you at risk of not receiving a full pay-out if you have to make an insurance claim on your contents policy. The three main areas of concern are:

  • Accurately calculating the value of possessions — if you’ve undervalued an item, you’ll only receive up to the stated value.
  • Being aware of single-item limits — your policy is likely to have a limit on what will be paid for any specific item, unless it’s listed separately.
  • Keeping an up-to-date list of possessions listed under the policy — if you replace a dodgy second-hand TV with a brand-new 64-inch screen, guess what? It’s going to be worth more.

Three Tips to Keep Your Insurance Up-to-Date

So how do you make sure the loss adjuster will be obliged to pay out the full value of your possessions, if you have to make an insurance claim following fire, flooding, theft or accidental damage? Here are three steps you can take:

  • Revalue your possessions on a regular basis. It’s a good habit to do this every time your contents insurance policy renews, rather than rushing to sign. Also, review your possessions if you’ve made a big purchase, or after birthdays or Christmas.
  • Check carefully for any expensive items. If you have high-value possessions, such as jewellery or tech equipment, their value may not be fully covered by the policy’s single-item limit. In this case, you’ll need to get your broker to have these items listed individually.
  • Use online valuation tools. If you’re having problems getting an accurate valuation, there’s a wealth of online resources that can help you. Your insurance broker should be able to point you in the right direction.

Having your possessions damaged or stolen is traumatic enough, without finding you’re not adequately covered by your insurance. Allied Claims would encourage everyone, young or old, to make sure all their valuations are completely up-to-date. That way, if you have to make a claim, we can ensure that you get the full value for each item.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


Does Home Insurance Have to Cost an Arm and a Leg?

If your latest home insurance quote makes you think you’re being penalised, you can rest assured — it’s not personal. The price of home insurance soared by a massive 36% in the twelve months to October 2023. So what’s caused a rise that seems out of all proportion to other costs?

  • Inflation — OK, bad as it’s been, inflation hasn’t got anywhere near 36%, but the cost of building materials has risen steeply. The quotes you pass on to the insurer’s loss adjuster are likely to be significantly more than before, and this is being reflected in premiums.
  • Climate change — There have been significantly more cases of extreme weather, such as storms or flooding, which can damage your home and lead to an insurance claim. The extra costs are being passed onto customers.
  • Your area — Some areas are considered as being at greater risk than others, whether the risk is flooding or burglary. If the risk in your area is now considered greater than before, you’ll see a sharp rise in your premium.
  • Home improvement — We all got out the DIY tools over lockdown, but if you used unusual materials, that could have an impact on your premium. This is because it would cost contractors a lot more to source materials or hire specialists for replacement.

How Can You Reduce Your Insurance Costs?

There are various measures you can take to reduce your insurance costs. One simple step, if you can afford it, is to pay annually upfront, rather than in monthly instalments. You can also look at whether you need your current size of property. If all your children have left, for instance, you may be paying high insurance premiums for a home that’s bigger than your needs.

You can also make your home more secure by installing high-security locks on windows and doors, burglar alarms and security cameras. In particular, make sure your home’s secure when you leave it empty — but the less you do that, the less your insurance is going to cost. A secure home not only makes your insurance cheaper, but also gives the loss adjuster no excuse to refuse your claim.

The single most crucial step you can take, though, is to arrange your policies through a good insurance broker, rather than trying to do it yourself. The broker will not only find you the most cost-effective policies that offer what you need, but reduce costs by bundling different policies together, where possible. You’ll not only save money, but also ensure that Allied Claims can get you what you’re entitled to, if you need to make an insurance claim.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


Self-Employed Business Insurance — Even if You Don’t Do Your Own Stunts

Some self-employed occupations are rather obviously in need of insurance. If you’re a stuntperson, for instance. Or a lion tamer, or someone who swims with sharks. But what about the rest of us, who have more mundane occupations, such as an accountant, a business coach — or an insurance loss assessor?

In fact, anyone who’s self-employed needs business insurance. Without it, you could end up facing a devastating financial burden, if anything goes wrong and someone sues you. This could destroy your business and even leave you personally bankrupt.

Even if you never have to make an insurance claim, though, having business insurance can offer positive benefits. Many potential customers, for example, will be looking at what insurance you have in place before deciding whether to go with you or a competitor. You could end up recovering the monthly premium you pay many times over.

There are various types of business insurance, though. How do you know which you need?

Types of Business Insurance

  • General Liability Insurance — This is the most fundamental type of business insurance, and it’s essential for any business, from a self-employed solopreneur to a large corporation. It will protect you from claims for personal injury or property damage, as well as for non-physical injuries such as slander and libel, misrepresentation or copyright infringement. Besides the obvious financial protection in case of a claim, having a general liability insurance policy in place is often a condition for signing a contract or leasing commercial space.
  • Professional Liability Insurance — This protects businesses that offer services or advice from claims of negligence or harm due to professional misjudgement. It’s easy to make one mistake, and if you’re unlucky that single slip could result in severe fines and legal fees. Professional liability insurance will ensure you can make an insurance claim to cover these.
  • Cyber Liability Insurance — It’s a rare business these days that doesn’t have its data stored digitally, and there are criminals out there who’d love to steal it. Whether it’s your own data, your employees’ or your customers’, you have a legal obligation to safeguard it — as well as the potentially devastating effects on your business if it’s stolen, either for ransom or to sell on the black market. This could result in fines, as well as hefty legal fees, but cyber liability insurance will make sure that the insurer’s loss adjuster will have to pass your claim.
  • Property Insurance — If you have any physical premises you use to undertake your business, you’ll need to have it insured. In the event of an incident such as fire, flooding, theft or accidental damage, property insurance will allow you to replace furnishing and equipment and have the working space restored, so that you can resume use of it as quickly as possible.
  • Business Interruption Insurance — If your business is hit by a disaster like fire or flooding, it may be difficult for you to continue trading for a while until your property is restored or your equipment replaced. That could have disastrous consequences for both the survival of the business and your own livelihood. Business interruption insurance will cover any downtime, as well as providing funds to allow you to get up and running as again soon as possible — for instance, locating an alternative temporary or permanent trading premises.

You’ll probably need most or all of these forms of insurance for your self-employed business, but identifying your exact requirements can be tricky. Allied Claims would always advise you to use a good insurance broker to get the right policies — then, if you have to claim on them, we can help you get the payments you’re entitled to.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


How to Ruin a Burglar’s Christmas

Christmas is supposed to be a time of goodwill to all — but does that really extend to the burglars who’d love to break into your home and steal your property? Traditionally, burglars love Christmas. All those valuable presents lying around, with people either too busy with preparations or else having too much fun to think about security — it’s a perfect opportunity.

So what can you do to ruin a burglar’s Christmas?

  • Tear up any envelopes or packaging with your name and address on it before you throw it away. Criminals may snoop in your bins to find information that will allow them to clone your identity.
  • Keep presents away from the windows and out of view — especially if they’re unwrapped, which would enable burglars to check out what’s valuable.
  • Always double lock your doors and windows when you go out, and invest in an alarm. But remember — an alarm isn’t just for Christmas.
  • If you’re going away for Christmas, don’t make it too obvious, such as leaving your suitcases in full view or marking it prominently on a calendar visible through the window. And don’t announce it on social media, either — that could be a reason for the insurer’s loss adjuster to turn down your insurance claim, if you do get burgled.
  • Join your local Neighbourhood Watch, and display the fact prominently in your window.
  • Don’t put up a “Beware of the Dog” sign. While this might seem intimidating, it actually tells the burglar that the dog has the run of the house, meaning there’s no alarm.

What if You Have Cash at Home?

Theft of presents in a burglary will normally be covered in an insurance claim, providing you haven’t invited it through negligence. But what if the burglar takes cash that’s lying around the place?

You might expect cash not to be a big problem any more, but actually its use has grown during the cost-of-living crisis, especially among younger people. In particular, the habit of “cash stuffing” has increased. This is where you divide your cash between different pots or envelopes, representing different parts of your household budget.

If a burglar makes off with your cash, it can be very hard to prove. The good news is that the loss adjuster will often take your word for it, although they may ask to see bank balances or photos. The bad news is that the amount they’ll pay out is very limited — sometimes as little as £100. The most common payout range is £200-£500.

If you’re likely to be keeping substantial amounts of cash at home over Christmas (or at any time), it’s important to go through your policy, preferably with your insurance broker, to find out its position on cash. A few policies offer cover of up to £5,000, but you have to know where to look. And, if possible, always keep any cash on the premises securely locked up.

Allied Claims would like to wish you a happy and burglary-free Christmas — and an unhappy one to the burglars.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


Don’t Let Blocked Gutters Ruin Your Home

We’ve already been visited this autumn by Agnes, Babet, Ciaran and Debi, and no doubt they’ll be bringing along plenty of their friends soon. So you need to be ready for them.

I’m talking about this year’s storms, of course. They’ve done plenty of very visible damage, but they can have less-obvious effects — and even normal autumn weather can cause problems, too.

With leaves falling anyway, the wind is likely to be blowing them into your gutters and downpipes. And if the winds are strong, twigs and other debris can end up blocking your guttering, too.

This is a problem because it prevents your gutters and downpipes from doing their job — directing the rain that falls on your roof safely down into the drains. If the guttering is blocked, the water will either pool on your roof or spill over onto the ground below.

The first of these can result in water getting into the roofspace, causing damage and resulting in mould or mildew growing — both health hazards. In the second case, the water can get into the foundations and damage them, or even cause flooding in your home.

And the worst is that, if you have to make an insurance claim for the damage done as a result of blocked guttering, the insurer’s loss adjuster could refuse your claim on the grounds of negligence.

Take Care of Your Roof

You need to get your gutters and downpipes repaired and cleared — if possible, before the next storm hits us. If you’re confident about working on a ladder, you can simply brush the debris out of the gutters, but rodding the downpipes is a more substantial job and may need a professional. And, while you’re doing all this, don’t forget to inspect the guttering for any damage.

That isn’t the only part of the roof, though, that the loss adjuster will expect you to maintain. If you have a pitched roof, check at the same time as you’re doing the guttering whether any of the tiles or slates are broken or missing. A flat roof can develop tears, and all these types of damage can let the water in. For any of these, you’ll need to get a professional roofer in to repair them.

Safeguarding your guttering and other aspects of your roof will ensure that it can do its job of protecting you through the winter. If you need to make an insurance claim, though, you’ll need evidence that you’ve maintained it properly, so keep fully itemised receipts and have someone take photos of any work you do yourself.

Then Allied Claims can make sure you get everything you’re entitled to from your claim.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


Make Sure Your Home’s Seat Belt Is Secure

Home insurance is a little like the seat belts in your car. You may never need to put it to the test, but it will be too late to sort it out if you do. Unfortunately, the fact that it doesn’t seem urgent can lead many people to ignore keeping it up to date. And, while finding out you’re under-insured when you make an insurance claim isn’t quite as devastating as flying through the windscreen, it can leave you seriously out of pocket.

Of course, in these difficult times it’s tempting to look for expenses you can cut, and unfortunately some people see home insurance as one of these. It’s been estimated that around 25% of homes in the UK are either under-insured or not insured at all.

To make matters worse, many of these are still paying their monthly premium, which could be nothing more than throwing money down the drain. If you’re under-insured, the insurer’s loss adjuster won’t authorise the payment you need, if you need to make a claim for fire, flood, theft or criminal damage.

What Can Go Wrong?

Any home should have two forms of insurance — building insurance, which covers damage to the structure, and contents insurance, which covers the movable possessions in the house. If you’re a homeowner, you’re responsible for both, whereas if you’re renting you normally don’t need to worry about building insurance.

Prices generally rise over time, but they’ve soared over the past couple of years. This means that the cost of replacing possessions lost in an incident may be significantly higher. For example, suppose you bought a TV a year ago for £1,000. Prices of TVs have jumped by around 30% since then, so it might cost you £1,300 to buy the same model today. Yet, if it’s still insured for the original price, that’s all the loss adjuster will allow you.

Finding an extra £300 might not be the end of the world, but multiply that for all your possessions, and you could find yourself seriously out of pocket. A survey by one Insurer suggests that adults on average buy £1,000 worth of new goods a year. A good practice is to keep a contents checklist which you regularly update — perhaps doing it on a room-by-room basis.

The position is even worse with building insurance, since the figures are significantly higher. Property prices have been worse hit by recent inflation than most other purchases, so your home’s value is likely to be substantially higher than when you insured it.

So what does this mean, if you have to make an insurance claim on your building insurance? At best, the insurer may apply an average clause. If you insured your home for £200,000, for instance, and it’s now worth £400,000, you’ll only receive half of any claim you make. At worst, they could decide that the under-insurance voids your policy, and you’ll receive nothing at all.

So make a habit of regularly reviewing the value of both your home and possessions. The best thing is to speak to an insurance broker, who can guide you through the process — then Allied Claims will be able to make sure you get every penny you’re entitled to, if you have to make a claim.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


Don’t Rely on Luck to Keep Your Home Insurance Valid

You might assume that, if you take out home insurance and keep the payments up, you’ll get a pay-out if something unfortunate happens. That’s mostly true, as long as it’s something covered in the policy — but there are exceptions.

The culprit is all that small print — the lines you have to strain to make out even with your glasses on. It all seems too much trouble to plough your way through it all, and it doesn’t really matter, anyway.

Except that it does. That small print might alert you to things that could allow the insurer’s loss adjuster to turn down your insurance claim and declare your policy invalid.

What to Avoid (or Notify Your Insurer About)

  • Leaving Doors and Windows Open — You may feel safe enough to leave windows open or doors unlocked if you pop out for a few minutes. Unfortunately, your insurer won’t agree, and if you should be burgled, they’re likely to refuse to pay.
  • Leaving Your Home Empty — If you leave your home unoccupied for an extended period (usually either over 30 days or over 60 days) your policy could be invalidated. You may need to arrange unoccupied home insurance.
  • Major Alterations — If you make major alterations, such as an extension or loft conversion, your insurance may not cover damage during the work, and the policy may need to be adjusted to reflect the changes. Make sure you contact your insurer well before the work starts.
  • Poor Home Maintenance — The policy will almost certainly require you to keep the property in reasonable condition. Failure to clear out the guttering or take action on signs of pest infection, for instance, could have far-reaching consequences for your home — and your insurer may not pay out if you haven’t taken action.
  • Dog or Cat Flaps — It wouldn’t be easy for a burglar to get in through a pet flap, but your insurer may regard it as possible and treat it as making your home insecure. Ideally, talk to your insurer before you install the flap, but let them know anyway.
  • Working from Home — Many home policies specifically exclude work-related claims. If you work from home, even if only occasionally, you need to inform your insurer. It may mean slightly higher premiums, but you’ll be covered.
  • An Insecure Key-Safe — There’s nothing wrong with having a key-safe to allow a trusted person (e.g. for a cleaner or pet-sitter) to get in, but make sure it’s high enough quality to be secure, otherwise your policy could be compromised.
  • Taking in a Lodger — Renting out a spare room can be a good way to boost your income, but your insurer needs to know if someone else is living in your home. You may need to adjust your policy, or even take out a new one.

Failure to be careful or to inform your insurer about a change could well mean that the loss adjuster would turn down any insurance claim you make on your property, declaring that you’ve invalidated the policy. Of course, you might get lucky and having nothing to claim on — but at Allied Claims we wouldn’t advise anyone to rely on luck where insurance is concerned.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.