Tag Archives: insurance claim

Does Home Insurance Have to Cost an Arm and a Leg?

If your latest home insurance quote makes you think you’re being penalised, you can rest assured — it’s not personal. The price of home insurance soared by a massive 36% in the twelve months to October 2023. So what’s caused a rise that seems out of all proportion to other costs?

  • Inflation — OK, bad as it’s been, inflation hasn’t got anywhere near 36%, but the cost of building materials has risen steeply. The quotes you pass on to the insurer’s loss adjuster are likely to be significantly more than before, and this is being reflected in premiums.
  • Climate change — There have been significantly more cases of extreme weather, such as storms or flooding, which can damage your home and lead to an insurance claim. The extra costs are being passed onto customers.
  • Your area — Some areas are considered as being at greater risk than others, whether the risk is flooding or burglary. If the risk in your area is now considered greater than before, you’ll see a sharp rise in your premium.
  • Home improvement — We all got out the DIY tools over lockdown, but if you used unusual materials, that could have an impact on your premium. This is because it would cost contractors a lot more to source materials or hire specialists for replacement.

How Can You Reduce Your Insurance Costs?

There are various measures you can take to reduce your insurance costs. One simple step, if you can afford it, is to pay annually upfront, rather than in monthly instalments. You can also look at whether you need your current size of property. If all your children have left, for instance, you may be paying high insurance premiums for a home that’s bigger than your needs.

You can also make your home more secure by installing high-security locks on windows and doors, burglar alarms and security cameras. In particular, make sure your home’s secure when you leave it empty — but the less you do that, the less your insurance is going to cost. A secure home not only makes your insurance cheaper, but also gives the loss adjuster no excuse to refuse your claim.

The single most crucial step you can take, though, is to arrange your policies through a good insurance broker, rather than trying to do it yourself. The broker will not only find you the most cost-effective policies that offer what you need, but reduce costs by bundling different policies together, where possible. You’ll not only save money, but also ensure that Allied Claims can get you what you’re entitled to, if you need to make an insurance claim.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


Self-Employed Business Insurance — Even if You Don’t Do Your Own Stunts

Some self-employed occupations are rather obviously in need of insurance. If you’re a stuntperson, for instance. Or a lion tamer, or someone who swims with sharks. But what about the rest of us, who have more mundane occupations, such as an accountant, a business coach — or an insurance loss assessor?

In fact, anyone who’s self-employed needs business insurance. Without it, you could end up facing a devastating financial burden, if anything goes wrong and someone sues you. This could destroy your business and even leave you personally bankrupt.

Even if you never have to make an insurance claim, though, having business insurance can offer positive benefits. Many potential customers, for example, will be looking at what insurance you have in place before deciding whether to go with you or a competitor. You could end up recovering the monthly premium you pay many times over.

There are various types of business insurance, though. How do you know which you need?

Types of Business Insurance

  • General Liability Insurance — This is the most fundamental type of business insurance, and it’s essential for any business, from a self-employed solopreneur to a large corporation. It will protect you from claims for personal injury or property damage, as well as for non-physical injuries such as slander and libel, misrepresentation or copyright infringement. Besides the obvious financial protection in case of a claim, having a general liability insurance policy in place is often a condition for signing a contract or leasing commercial space.
  • Professional Liability Insurance — This protects businesses that offer services or advice from claims of negligence or harm due to professional misjudgement. It’s easy to make one mistake, and if you’re unlucky that single slip could result in severe fines and legal fees. Professional liability insurance will ensure you can make an insurance claim to cover these.
  • Cyber Liability Insurance — It’s a rare business these days that doesn’t have its data stored digitally, and there are criminals out there who’d love to steal it. Whether it’s your own data, your employees’ or your customers’, you have a legal obligation to safeguard it — as well as the potentially devastating effects on your business if it’s stolen, either for ransom or to sell on the black market. This could result in fines, as well as hefty legal fees, but cyber liability insurance will make sure that the insurer’s loss adjuster will have to pass your claim.
  • Property Insurance — If you have any physical premises you use to undertake your business, you’ll need to have it insured. In the event of an incident such as fire, flooding, theft or accidental damage, property insurance will allow you to replace furnishing and equipment and have the working space restored, so that you can resume use of it as quickly as possible.
  • Business Interruption Insurance — If your business is hit by a disaster like fire or flooding, it may be difficult for you to continue trading for a while until your property is restored or your equipment replaced. That could have disastrous consequences for both the survival of the business and your own livelihood. Business interruption insurance will cover any downtime, as well as providing funds to allow you to get up and running as again soon as possible — for instance, locating an alternative temporary or permanent trading premises.

You’ll probably need most or all of these forms of insurance for your self-employed business, but identifying your exact requirements can be tricky. Allied Claims would always advise you to use a good insurance broker to get the right policies — then, if you have to claim on them, we can help you get the payments you’re entitled to.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


How to Ruin a Burglar’s Christmas

Christmas is supposed to be a time of goodwill to all — but does that really extend to the burglars who’d love to break into your home and steal your property? Traditionally, burglars love Christmas. All those valuable presents lying around, with people either too busy with preparations or else having too much fun to think about security — it’s a perfect opportunity.

So what can you do to ruin a burglar’s Christmas?

  • Tear up any envelopes or packaging with your name and address on it before you throw it away. Criminals may snoop in your bins to find information that will allow them to clone your identity.
  • Keep presents away from the windows and out of view — especially if they’re unwrapped, which would enable burglars to check out what’s valuable.
  • Always double lock your doors and windows when you go out, and invest in an alarm. But remember — an alarm isn’t just for Christmas.
  • If you’re going away for Christmas, don’t make it too obvious, such as leaving your suitcases in full view or marking it prominently on a calendar visible through the window. And don’t announce it on social media, either — that could be a reason for the insurer’s loss adjuster to turn down your insurance claim, if you do get burgled.
  • Join your local Neighbourhood Watch, and display the fact prominently in your window.
  • Don’t put up a “Beware of the Dog” sign. While this might seem intimidating, it actually tells the burglar that the dog has the run of the house, meaning there’s no alarm.

What if You Have Cash at Home?

Theft of presents in a burglary will normally be covered in an insurance claim, providing you haven’t invited it through negligence. But what if the burglar takes cash that’s lying around the place?

You might expect cash not to be a big problem any more, but actually its use has grown during the cost-of-living crisis, especially among younger people. In particular, the habit of “cash stuffing” has increased. This is where you divide your cash between different pots or envelopes, representing different parts of your household budget.

If a burglar makes off with your cash, it can be very hard to prove. The good news is that the loss adjuster will often take your word for it, although they may ask to see bank balances or photos. The bad news is that the amount they’ll pay out is very limited — sometimes as little as £100. The most common payout range is £200-£500.

If you’re likely to be keeping substantial amounts of cash at home over Christmas (or at any time), it’s important to go through your policy, preferably with your insurance broker, to find out its position on cash. A few policies offer cover of up to £5,000, but you have to know where to look. And, if possible, always keep any cash on the premises securely locked up.

Allied Claims would like to wish you a happy and burglary-free Christmas — and an unhappy one to the burglars.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


Don’t Let Blocked Gutters Ruin Your Home

We’ve already been visited this autumn by Agnes, Babet, Ciaran and Debi, and no doubt they’ll be bringing along plenty of their friends soon. So you need to be ready for them.

I’m talking about this year’s storms, of course. They’ve done plenty of very visible damage, but they can have less-obvious effects — and even normal autumn weather can cause problems, too.

With leaves falling anyway, the wind is likely to be blowing them into your gutters and downpipes. And if the winds are strong, twigs and other debris can end up blocking your guttering, too.

This is a problem because it prevents your gutters and downpipes from doing their job — directing the rain that falls on your roof safely down into the drains. If the guttering is blocked, the water will either pool on your roof or spill over onto the ground below.

The first of these can result in water getting into the roofspace, causing damage and resulting in mould or mildew growing — both health hazards. In the second case, the water can get into the foundations and damage them, or even cause flooding in your home.

And the worst is that, if you have to make an insurance claim for the damage done as a result of blocked guttering, the insurer’s loss adjuster could refuse your claim on the grounds of negligence.

Take Care of Your Roof

You need to get your gutters and downpipes repaired and cleared — if possible, before the next storm hits us. If you’re confident about working on a ladder, you can simply brush the debris out of the gutters, but rodding the downpipes is a more substantial job and may need a professional. And, while you’re doing all this, don’t forget to inspect the guttering for any damage.

That isn’t the only part of the roof, though, that the loss adjuster will expect you to maintain. If you have a pitched roof, check at the same time as you’re doing the guttering whether any of the tiles or slates are broken or missing. A flat roof can develop tears, and all these types of damage can let the water in. For any of these, you’ll need to get a professional roofer in to repair them.

Safeguarding your guttering and other aspects of your roof will ensure that it can do its job of protecting you through the winter. If you need to make an insurance claim, though, you’ll need evidence that you’ve maintained it properly, so keep fully itemised receipts and have someone take photos of any work you do yourself.

Then Allied Claims can make sure you get everything you’re entitled to from your claim.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


Make Sure Your Home’s Seat Belt Is Secure

Home insurance is a little like the seat belts in your car. You may never need to put it to the test, but it will be too late to sort it out if you do. Unfortunately, the fact that it doesn’t seem urgent can lead many people to ignore keeping it up to date. And, while finding out you’re under-insured when you make an insurance claim isn’t quite as devastating as flying through the windscreen, it can leave you seriously out of pocket.

Of course, in these difficult times it’s tempting to look for expenses you can cut, and unfortunately some people see home insurance as one of these. It’s been estimated that around 25% of homes in the UK are either under-insured or not insured at all.

To make matters worse, many of these are still paying their monthly premium, which could be nothing more than throwing money down the drain. If you’re under-insured, the insurer’s loss adjuster won’t authorise the payment you need, if you need to make a claim for fire, flood, theft or criminal damage.

What Can Go Wrong?

Any home should have two forms of insurance — building insurance, which covers damage to the structure, and contents insurance, which covers the movable possessions in the house. If you’re a homeowner, you’re responsible for both, whereas if you’re renting you normally don’t need to worry about building insurance.

Prices generally rise over time, but they’ve soared over the past couple of years. This means that the cost of replacing possessions lost in an incident may be significantly higher. For example, suppose you bought a TV a year ago for £1,000. Prices of TVs have jumped by around 30% since then, so it might cost you £1,300 to buy the same model today. Yet, if it’s still insured for the original price, that’s all the loss adjuster will allow you.

Finding an extra £300 might not be the end of the world, but multiply that for all your possessions, and you could find yourself seriously out of pocket. A survey by one Insurer suggests that adults on average buy £1,000 worth of new goods a year. A good practice is to keep a contents checklist which you regularly update — perhaps doing it on a room-by-room basis.

The position is even worse with building insurance, since the figures are significantly higher. Property prices have been worse hit by recent inflation than most other purchases, so your home’s value is likely to be substantially higher than when you insured it.

So what does this mean, if you have to make an insurance claim on your building insurance? At best, the insurer may apply an average clause. If you insured your home for £200,000, for instance, and it’s now worth £400,000, you’ll only receive half of any claim you make. At worst, they could decide that the under-insurance voids your policy, and you’ll receive nothing at all.

So make a habit of regularly reviewing the value of both your home and possessions. The best thing is to speak to an insurance broker, who can guide you through the process — then Allied Claims will be able to make sure you get every penny you’re entitled to, if you have to make a claim.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


Don’t Rely on Luck to Keep Your Home Insurance Valid

You might assume that, if you take out home insurance and keep the payments up, you’ll get a pay-out if something unfortunate happens. That’s mostly true, as long as it’s something covered in the policy — but there are exceptions.

The culprit is all that small print — the lines you have to strain to make out even with your glasses on. It all seems too much trouble to plough your way through it all, and it doesn’t really matter, anyway.

Except that it does. That small print might alert you to things that could allow the insurer’s loss adjuster to turn down your insurance claim and declare your policy invalid.

What to Avoid (or Notify Your Insurer About)

  • Leaving Doors and Windows Open — You may feel safe enough to leave windows open or doors unlocked if you pop out for a few minutes. Unfortunately, your insurer won’t agree, and if you should be burgled, they’re likely to refuse to pay.
  • Leaving Your Home Empty — If you leave your home unoccupied for an extended period (usually either over 30 days or over 60 days) your policy could be invalidated. You may need to arrange unoccupied home insurance.
  • Major Alterations — If you make major alterations, such as an extension or loft conversion, your insurance may not cover damage during the work, and the policy may need to be adjusted to reflect the changes. Make sure you contact your insurer well before the work starts.
  • Poor Home Maintenance — The policy will almost certainly require you to keep the property in reasonable condition. Failure to clear out the guttering or take action on signs of pest infection, for instance, could have far-reaching consequences for your home — and your insurer may not pay out if you haven’t taken action.
  • Dog or Cat Flaps — It wouldn’t be easy for a burglar to get in through a pet flap, but your insurer may regard it as possible and treat it as making your home insecure. Ideally, talk to your insurer before you install the flap, but let them know anyway.
  • Working from Home — Many home policies specifically exclude work-related claims. If you work from home, even if only occasionally, you need to inform your insurer. It may mean slightly higher premiums, but you’ll be covered.
  • An Insecure Key-Safe — There’s nothing wrong with having a key-safe to allow a trusted person (e.g. for a cleaner or pet-sitter) to get in, but make sure it’s high enough quality to be secure, otherwise your policy could be compromised.
  • Taking in a Lodger — Renting out a spare room can be a good way to boost your income, but your insurer needs to know if someone else is living in your home. You may need to adjust your policy, or even take out a new one.

Failure to be careful or to inform your insurer about a change could well mean that the loss adjuster would turn down any insurance claim you make on your property, declaring that you’ve invalidated the policy. Of course, you might get lucky and having nothing to claim on — but at Allied Claims we wouldn’t advise anyone to rely on luck where insurance is concerned.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


Why Does My Property for Rent Have Two Values?

If you’re getting your property valued for a Landlord Insurance policy, you’d think you could just look at a final figure in the calculation, and that’s what the property’s worth. Simple.

Well, you’d think…

In fact, what you’ll find is that your property may have either or both of two different valuations — Buildings Declared Value (BDV) and Buildings Sum Insured (BSI). But it gets even more confusing, because these aren’t necessarily the terms that will be used in your policy. The BDV might be described as the declared value and the BSI as the sum insured.

However they’re described, though, it’s essential that you understand what these valuations represent, and that you have the appropriate one on your policy. Otherwise, if you have to make an insurance claim, you may not get as much as you need from the insurer’s loss adjuster.

What Are the Two Types of Valuation?

So why are there two different ways of valuing your property? Shouldn’t the value be the value? And which one will ensure you get the correct payout on your insurance claim?

BDV or declared value — This is the straightforward rebuild cost, taking into account the value of the bricks and mortar, as well as fixtures such as fitted kitchens and bathrooms. It also covers outbuildings and car parks, as well as extra cost, such as professional fees and removal of debris. However, it doesn’t cover considerations like the land’s value or how desirable the area is. Also, the valuation is for the day the policy begins, so if you have a BDV, you may need to have the property regularly revalued.

BSI or sum insured — This will be a higher sum than the BDV, since it takes into account inflation in building costs or appreciation in market value since the policy began. This is particularly important at the moment, since the price of building materials has soared since the pandemic, while there are likely to be delays in getting the work done. That’s likely to push the total rebuilding cost even further up.

It’s tempting, with so much else keeping you busy, to put your insurance policy away and forget about it, but this could be disastrous. It’s vital to look at it regularly (or, better still, have an insurance broker look at it) and check whether it needs to be updated. Then, if you do have to make a claim, Allied Claims can make sure that the loss adjuster has no choice but to pay you the full repair or rebuilding sum.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.

Moped Menace — The New Crash for Cash Epidemic

The “crash for cash” scam isn’t a new thing, but a new variant is sweeping North London — delivery drivers on mopeds. The “traditional” version tends to involve car drivers braking suddenly to make the vehicle behind go into the back of them, but this new type sees moped riders coming out from hiding at the last moment and driving straight into the front of a car.

The Insurance Fraud Bureau (IFB) describes this moped menace as an “epidemic”, with about 2,250 motorists targeted in London in the past two years. The majority of cases have been in North London. Quite apart from the financial impact (insurance firms estimate they’ve paid out at least £27 million in insurance claims for these scams), many of the victims have been left traumatised by the incidents.

Many of the fraudsters are thought to be delivery drivers, often delivering takeaways, and they tend to operate in more affluent areas. They sometimes work with an accomplice, either as a “witness” or providing a van to hide behind and emerge at the last moment to force the crash. They then tend to fake injury, in order to persuade the insurer’s loss adjuster to award them a higher pay-out.

What to Do About Crash for Cash Scams

Mark Allen, head of fraud and financial services at the Association of British Insurers, considers that “Staged crash for cash scams are a dangerous menace on our roads. Often highly organised, and constantly looking for new targets to exploit, these criminals put lives at risk.”

It’s difficult for the victim of these scams to prove their innocence and get the loss adjuster to reject the insurance claim. However, that doesn’t mean there’s nothing you can do.

Both the police and the insurance industry are eager to tackle this menace. If you’re involved in an incident you suspect of being a crash for cash scam, you should immediately contact both the police and your insurer. You should also report it to the IFB’s Cheatline on 0800 422 0421.

It’s dangerous enough on the road, without criminals deliberately causing road accidents. Allied Claims offer you our sympathy if you’ve fallen foul of this scam — but reporting it may help the insurance industry make it a less attractive strategy for the fraudsters.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


E-Bikes and E-Scooters — a Deadly New Fire Risk

Increasingly, delivery workers are using e-bikes, which let them increase their capacity by going further and faster. Unfortunately, this has created a potentially fatal risk, if you store and charge e-bikes and e-scooters indoors. Last year, their batteries caused 216 fires, with 147 injuries and 6 deaths.

The London Fire Brigade attended two such fires on consecutive days in April, while another a few months earlier sadly resulted in a fatality. In one case, the problem was made worse because the burning bike was blocking the route of escape. In another case, the already smoking bike was moved to a communal area, allowing the fire to spread more easily.

A good deal of the problem seems to derive, as in at least one of these cases, from people buying non-standard or second-hand batteries or chargers online. This tends to happen especially when they convert an ordinary bike themselves. The electric motors often come without batteries or chargers, and many save money by buying them cheap online.

This can be extremely dangerous, since the lithium batteries used are significantly more powerful than regular batteries. If they are overcharged, overheated, crushed or penetrated, they can catch fire, or even explode. To add insult to injury, your insurer’s loss adjuster may well reject your insurance claim if carelessness charging an e-bike has caused the fire.

Staying Safe with E-Bikes and E-Scooters

  • Only buy batteries and chargers from reputable sources. There’s usually a reason why online bargains are cheap.
  • Check that your battery and charger meet UK safety standards. Warning signs include being hot to touch or going out of shape.
  • Make sure that the charger you buy is the official model for the battery. A reputable dealer will advise you on this.
  • Don’t charge your battery immediately after use. The battery is likely to heat up during use, so make sure it’s completely cooled down before charging.
  • Always unplug your charger as soon as it’s finished charging. This will be part of the manufacturers guidelines — read and follow all these guidelines.
  • Even if you follow all advice, any area where you charge is a fire risk and should be fitted with smoke alarms.
  • Whether or not you have an e-bike or e-scooter, never block your route of escape.
  • Never leave your battery on charge while you’re asleep or away from home. The rule of thumb is only charge any device if you’ll be able to smell the burning in time.

Following this advice will substantially reduce the risk of your e-bike or e-scooter causing a fire. If a fire does start in spite of everything, the loss adjuster should have no reason to turn down your insurance claim.

E-bikes and e-scooters can be both useful and fun, if used correctly. Allied Claims hope you can continuing enjoying them by staying safe.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.


Don’t Let Your Investment Go Up in Smoke

While letting your property out to tenants can be a very successful business, there are plenty of pitfalls for the unwary. One you might not have thought of is a tenant running a cannabis farm from your property.

With an “industry” estimated to be worth £2.4 billion in England and Wales during 2021, there’s plenty of incentive to grow the drug. Unfortunately, this can be extremely expensive for the owner. Quite apart from any problems proving that you’re not legally responsible, a cannabis farm can cause plenty of damage. And, if you make an insurance claim to recover your costs, you could find the insurer’s loss adjuster turning you down.

One owner, who suffered £15,000 worth of damage in 2018, found herself unable to get any recompense, even though the letting agency she’d hired had failed to take note of the warning signs. Due to the police being unable to establish beyond reasonable doubt who had actually set up the farm, no-one was ever charged over the case — meaning that she was told she’d have no chance of reclaiming the money from either tenant or agency.

What Can You Do About It?

In 2020, 445 cannabis farms were found in London alone, with the West Midlands, Lancashire and West Yorkshire other hotspots. Nationally, 48% of investigations into electricity theft, a common part of the operation, are related to cannabis production.

If you’re a landlord, you can protect yourself against this kind of abuse in two ways. Firstly, you can ensure you work with a good letting agency, who’ll identify obvious warning signs. These might include:

  • Tenants who want to pay several months in advance in cash.
  • Tenants who fail to cooperate with inspections and who change locks.
  • Blacked-out windows and sealed vents.
  • Large amounts of condensation on the windows.
  • Electric fans running all the time.
  • Tampering with electricity meters and electric cabling.
  • A distinctive sickly-sweet smell inside the house.

At the same time, it’s important to make sure your insurance policy includes adequate cover for this situation. Many policies restrict insurance claims for cannabis farm damage to as little as £5,000, or even completely exclude them.

To make sure the loss adjuster doesn’t have a reason to refuse payment, Allied Claims would advise you to check your policy thoroughly — preferably by going through a good insurance broker, who’ll help you find a more appropriate policy, if necessary.


Disclaimer

All content within this column is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the Insurance advice of your own broker or any other Insurance professional. Allied Claims is not responsible or liable for any decisions made by a user based on the content of this site.

Allied Claims is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own Insurance broker if you’re in any way concerned about your insurance cover.